Sleep Tight & Innovate with Misfit Shine

misfit shine

Submit your innovative healthcare idea to #WHPC15 to win 10 Misfit Shines for a clinical trial.

Medstro’s Wearables in Healthcare Pilot Challenge is off to a quick start, with 22 submissions and several months yet to go before the live-pitch off in Boston. In the challenge, physicians, healthcare professionals and other interested parties are invited to propose their ideal use for many of the wearables on the market today. Within the online forum, they’ll receive mentorship, feedback and commentary on their ideas. As the contest progresses, they’ll also have the opportunity to win certain wearables, prize money or mentorship, all in hopes of turning their wearable dreams into realities.

One such prize is the Misfit Shine, which combines a 3-axis accelerometer with Misfit’s proprietary data science and algorithms to track activity and sleep. The winner of the Shine prize will receive 10 of the devices for use in a clinical trial. “The story that wearables tell is particularly interesting for the healthcare community,” Alyssa Anderson, Communications Associate at Misfit, says when asked why the company chose to join Medstro’s contest. “Gaining insight on activity and sleep data can help doctors make more informed decisions on the health of their patients.”

She believes that one of the best ways to bring change to our healthcare system is through providing access and awareness to the data these wearables collect. And when it comes to choosing who will receive ten of these innovative wearables, Anderson says that Misfit will simply be looking for innovation above and beyond what currently exists on the market. “Right now, we can’t choose – we welcome and encourage all to apply!”

To learn more about the Misfit Shine (and to inspire you to submit your own innovative pitch for the best use of Shine in healthcare), watch this video:

Jenni Whalen

Jenni Whalen

    Jenni Whalen is the Executive Assistant of Editorial at Upworthy. She was previously MedTech Boston's Managing Editor and has an MS in Journalism from Boston University, as well as a BA in Psychology from Bucknell University. Whalen has written for Greatist, Boston magazine, AZ Central Healthy Living and the New England Journal of Medicine, among other places. She has also worked as a conference planner, ghost writer, researcher and content developer.

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